rank city | ramen edition: Rishi

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The third stop in rank city: ramen edition was Rishi for some lunchtime ramen. Turns out Rishi was pretty dead during a weekday lunch hour. Maybe downtown folks don’t realize it’s open or they just don’t like ramen. Rishi has been open for a few years now and offers ramen, sushi, and…burgers? I recommend just sticking with the ramen.

What we ordered: Edamame hummus, pork ramen, chicken ramen.

Appetizer: The appetizer options are pretty limited at lunch. We went with the edamame hummus, which cost $7.95. It wasn’t a bad snack, but was pretty bland and underwhelming for being $8. Score:  2.5 IMG_0233Broth: Rishi’s pork ramen comes with their “house broth,” and it is one of my favorite things that I’ve eaten in Columbus. It is so rich and has a depth of flavor that leaves you very satisfied and full. It has the right level of fattiness without being one-note. Luckily for you, the chicken ramen also comes with the “house broth.”  Score: 4.5IMG_0235

Protein: I am a big fan of Rishi’s serving of shredded pork in their ramen. I know a slice of pork belly is more traditional, but the shredded pork is simply easier to eat. Not to mention it has a great flavor and texture. The egg rivaled Meshikou’s in its perfection; wonderfully gelatinous. I know that is a ridiculous way to describe an egg, but you guys don’t understand how much I love a perfectly cooked egg (and hate an overcooked one). Sadly, the chicken was not as delicious as the pork and grew a bit chewy the longer it sat in the broth. Score: 4IMG_0241Noodles: Rishi’s noodles are good but I would prefer them slightly more al dente. They tend toward sogginess by the end of the meal if you are a slow eater like me.  Score: 3.5IMG_0238Environment/Service: Our server was very attentive and didn’t seem to mind that we were in a bit of rush. Rishi markets itself as hip and elegant, and for the most part, they accomplish that. The decor is clean without feeling sparse. Someone (I suspect sneakily) played Jay Z’s “Holy Grail” (feat Justin Timberlake), so I can’t fully agree with the categorization of Rishi as an elegant restaurant. I love you, Jay, but we all know Magna Carta…Holy Grail was trash. Score: 4

Affordability: Lunch prices are a little lower than dinner, and the ramen came in at $10.95 (pork) and $9.95 (chicken). With the hummus, the total came to $31.01, which is a little steep for lunch. But that broth is so damn good, it’s hard to be too upset. And to be honest, I’m not even sure the lunch portion is smaller. Score: 3.5

Overall thoughts: I’ve been to Rishi multiple times and I’ve tried the sushi and some apps and observed others eating the burgers, but truly, the ramen is where it’s at. They definitely force the vibe there and would benefit from relaxing a bit, but their pork ramen is a delicious success. Sadly, we did not receive the wooden Gandalf-sized spoons that I’ve come to expect (maybe they are reserved for dinner?), but I am a big fan of the stone bowls, which keep the ramen piping hot. I always feel full and satisfied after eating a bowl of Rishi ramen, whether at lunch or dinner. Skip the $8 appetizer to have a very affordable meal, especially for lunch.

Total score: 22, plus 1.5 bonus points for portion size. 23.5.

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rank city: ramen edition | Tensuke 3/20/16

candyThe second stop in rank city: ramen edition was Tensuke Market for some Palm Sunday ramen. Tensuke might be one of my favorite places in Columbus. It’s an authentic Japanese market full of inexpensive produce, sushi-grade fish, 20 lb bags of rice, and racks and racks of weird candy. It also has a dining area where you can get sushi, soups, and other fast Japanese foods.

What we ordered: Steamed pork dumplings, karaage, tonkatsu ramen with pork tenderloin, miso ramen with spicy kimchi pork

Appetizer: The appetizers are not the main appeal at Tensuke, but I have no restraint when it comes to dumplings. The gyoza had a nice filling of pork and spices, but were a bit underwhelming. Same goes for the karaage. They weren’t as light and crispy as Meshikou’s, but still offered a nice start to the meal. For both appetizers, we mixed up our own dipping sauces. This is a pretty key part of dining at Tensuke; you get/need to mix up your own concoction of soy sauce, chili oil, sriracha, and whatever else is available to add to your meal. Score: 3IMG_0384

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Broth: Tensuke has a pretty big variety of choices for broth and protein, but I felt I had to go with the tonkatsu broth for authenticity’s sake. Sadly, it was a pretty plain backbone for my ramen, and needed to be dressed up with the aforementioned Japanese condiments. But, the miso/kimchi combination needed no dressing up. I was surprised by the layers of flavor present in the miso broth, and the kimchi kicked up the spice level perfectly. Score: We scored the tonkatsu a 3 and the spicy kimchi a 4, for an average of 3.5

Protein: Because Tensuke is designed to be a fast dining experience, I don’t think they’re as concerned with sending out perfectly executed 6 minute eggs. However, nothing is sadder than an overcooked egg, and I’m tearing up just thinking about that solid yolk. While the pork tenderloin was not as memorable, the spicy pork in our miso ramen was very flavorful and a nice addition to the bowl. Score: 3IMG_0383

Noodles: Quantity over quality may be the case for Tensuke’s noodles. They are undoubtedly better than your average Top Ramen noodles, but didn’t quite reach that chewy noodle nirvana. There did, however, seem to be a never ending supply coming from my bowl. Score: 3.5

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My proudest dining moment.

Environment/Service: I’ve never been to Japan, but I would guess Tensuke feels the most authentic of all the Columbus Japanese restaurants. You order and pick up your food at the counter, but the service is fast and friendly. It’s typically a bustling place, with shoppers and families with little kids all waiting for their turn at a table. But there is no edging out other diners with side eye or loud harrumphing. We went on a busy Sunday afternoon and were happy to wander the aisles of the grocery side while we waited for a table. Score: 4.5

Affordability: Two appetizers and two bowls of ramen came to $24.56. Almost felt like stealing. Score: 4.5

Overall thoughts: I love Tensuke, so it was hard to give middling scores in many of the categories. It’s designed to be a fast, casual dining experience but not in the Chipotle way. Their food and products are very good, but finesse is not the name of their game. While it won’t satisfy any fine dining desires, Tensuke is a particularly great lunch spot with excellent prices and generous portions.

Total score: 22, plus 1 bonus point for being featured on Morning Edition and another for how fun it is to say “Tensuke.” 24.

rank city: ramen edition | Meshikou 3/18/16

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The first stop in rank city: ramen edition was Meshikou. Meshikou opened in 2014 and like most good Asian restaurants, it’s located in a strip mall, sandwiched between a popcorn store and a poker club. Also there is a hockey store, because those are a thing.

What we ordered: Meshikou Karaage, Barbecue Chashu Bun, Shoyu Paitan Ramen with pork tenderloin

Appetizer: The Barbecue Chashu Bun (pork belly steam buns) and Meshikou Karaage (Japanese fried chicken) were a great start to our meal. I’ve had some misses with pork belly in the past, so am always a bit hesitant with the first bite. The pork belly had a very tasty barbecue glaze and was cooked nicely. The fatty parts weren’t gristly or chewy, which is always my fear with pork belly. The buns were slightly overdressed with lettuce; we would have been happy with just a few cucumber slices to add coolness and crunch.

I was a big fan of the karaage. Asian fried chicken, whether Japanese or Korean, is proving to be one of my favorite styles. The breading was light and crispy while the meat was still very moist and juicy. It also came with a tasty tangy sauce, and in a cute miniature fryer basket. I haven’t eaten KFC since my whole family got food poisoning when I was 10, but in the words of one diner/boyfriend, “This is like popcorn chicken for royalty.” Score: 4IMG_0214

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Broth: Sadly, Meshikou no longer makes pork broth. Based on Yelp comments, they don’t think they can get enough quality pork to make their broth, which is hard to believe IMO, but whatevs. Instead, their ramen is served with a chicken broth. You can choose a milky or clear broth, but who wants clear broth with ramen?  I was surprised by how good the chicken broth was, but it just didn’t reach the depth that tonkatsu (pork) broth gets. Score: 3.5ramen bowl

Protein: We went with pork tenderloin in the ramen because we were already having pork belly in the steam buns. The tenderloin was cooked nicely and soaked up a lot of flavor from the broth. The egg was cooked pretty perfectly for ramen. Firm white with a viscous yolk. Egg yolk is the best condiment/sauce you could put on anything, and this one did not disappoint. Score: 4

Noodles: We had heard that Meshikou uses the same ramen noodles as David Chang, so we had high expectations. The noodle rumors are unconfirmed, but these were delicious, in any case. Perfectly chewy and dense without being too al dente. Score: 4.5

Environment/Service: I was expecting Meshikou to be more crowded on Friday night, but we were seated immediately. There were only big tables open, so we sat at the bar. I don’t always enjoy eating at the bar, but in this case it was comfortable. All of our plates and bowls (for splitting the ramen) were warmed, which is a major point-scorer for me. There’s nothing worse than having hot food served on a cold plate. Our server was great–nice and attentive but not chatty. We also heard two Whitney songs while there, so points for that. Score: 4

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Affordability: The two appetizers and one bowl of ramen clocked in at $27. Not a bad price for two people to eat dinner, but we did only have one bowl of ramen. Score: 3.5

Overall thoughts: This was my first trip to Meshikou. After reading the Yelp reviews and learning they no longer had pork broth, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was surprised by the good flavor of the chicken broth, but it didn’t hit the ramen expectations I had in mind. I never got the sated feeling that deep, fatty, super flavorful pork broth offers. Which also meant I didn’t feel that full, despite eating half of everything I described. The ramen also cooled down rather quickly; I think it was served in a plastic bowl. I will definitely go back to Meshikou and try some more things, but will probably get my own bowl of ramen. They do not serve alcohol, but the cucumber water is a nice touch.

Total score: 23.5, plus 1 bonus point for the Japanese candy we got in lieu of fortune cookies. 24.5.

Stay tuned for the next ramen stop!

rank city: ramen edition

For the inaugural set of Rank City posts (in which I rank whatever I choose), I’ve decided to start with ramen. Columbus has a surprising amount of ramen restaurants; a new one even opened while I was working on these posts. If you never got on the David Chang train and to you, ramen costs .99 and tastes like MSG, you are depriving your tastes buds of an experience. While Columbus’ ramen may not rival Momofuku or the real deal in Japan, it’s worth checking out the varieties.

On to the fine print. I will rank the restaurants and their ramen on a 5 point scale for each of these categories:

  • Appetizer
  • Broth
  • Noodles
  • Protein
  • Environment/Service
  • Affordability

For a total high score of 30, plus any bonus points I want to throw in.

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Enjoy!

music mondays: spring sounds

IT’S FINALLY STARTING TO FEEL LIKE SPRING. I still had to scrape my windshield this morning, but it’s currently 62° and I WILL NOT be wearing a coat this evening. Take that, Mother Nature.

When spring finally starts to truly emerge, I always want something light and fun to listen to. Cue the folk pop tracks.

NPR has been streaming Nickel Creek‘s new album, so I’ve been getting my fill before it actually comes out. Really enjoying it, but I’ll save most of the Nickel Creek reviewing for after I see them in May (!!!). “Destination” is an early favorite, as well as their cover of “Hayloft”.

Mountain Man is this super folksy female trio. I’ve listened to them in the past and saw them a few years ago when they were touring with Feist as her backup singers. They wore these kinda crazy-looking long, drapey dresses and did weird hand dancing. But I liked them. So when I heard that one of the girls, Amelia, had teamed up with electronic producer, Nicholas Sanborn, I was pretty interested. Together they are Sylvan Esso and I’ve been playing these two songs on repeat lately:

The Columbus-based band Saintseneca seems perched to reach some significant indie attention levels. I’m happy to see them do well, having caught various stages of their growth. I wasn’t a big fan of Saintseneca when I first heard them four years ago. I really wanted to like them, but their sound wasn’t as dynamic then and their songs all seemed to merge together (in the bad way). NPR is also streaming their new album, Dark Arc, out tomorrow. Check out “Happy Alone”:

This last group isn’t a folk band, but they’re still providing a great soundtrack as spring tries to get sprung. A few weeks ago, I starred one of St. Paul and the Broken Bones‘s songs on a SXSW playlist, without really paying attention to who the group was. Then, as I was driving into work one morning, I heard an interview with the lead singer, Paul Janeway, and snippets of a few more tracks. I was hooked. These guys are from Alabama and make soul music that feeds my Motown-loving ears.

“Call Me” was the first song I heard.

“Broken Bones and Pocket Change” is a great example of what this band can do.

There aren’t any good videos of it, but “It’s Midnight” is a short, soulful track, and one of my favorites. St. Paul will be crooning away tomorrow night at Skully’s. I was really looking forward to seeing them at Rumba, knowing it would be an intimate show with a packed house (and cheaper beer). They quickly sold out tickets then moved the show to Skully’s to accommodate. Good for the band, a little sad for me.

Happy listening and happier spring!

 

help me name a new column

As I said in my last post, I moved recently. It was initially a pretty awful situation. I’d been living in the same house for 3 years, with two roommates, and a terrible human for a landlord. Fortunately, I could look past the landlord and really liked where I lived. We knew the landlord was selling the house and that we’d have to move out, but were expecting that to happen in the spring or summer. BUT, being a terrible human, our landlord never kept us up-to-date on the timing. So on February 1, the new landlord sent us an email saying he had closed on the house and we had 30 days to GTFO. But he was really sorry and blah blah blah.

New landlord’s nice dressing and well-groomed beard quickly lost their charm.

I was able to find a place (thanks Jackie!) in my same neighborhood. Actually, I only moved two blocks. Two blocks in the opposite direction than I would have liked, but I was in a bind. Overall, I like my place. Sure, I had to compromise on some parts because of the short notice, but I’m satisfied.

So, that’s the background info. Should also say that I’m no longer living with roommates. So far, I love living alone (I knew that I would). Now that I’m doing this new part of life, I want to document it. So I want to start a new column, like Music Mondays, devoted to living alone for the first time, and all the facets of that.

Aspects I hope to focus on:

  • encounters with neighbors
  • not being consumed by my introversion
  • being a single, 20-something white girl in a largely low-income, minority neighborhood
  • tips/tricks for hosting in a small apartment
  • sleeping through the noise of drag racing and city buses

Here’s where I need your help. I’m struggling to come up with a name for this column. I’m not sad about my situation and I don’t want some sappy title like SINGLE AND LOVING IT :)<3!!!!  or FLYING SOLO. Woof. I asked some friends for their input, and so far my favorite suggestion, from my friend Mal, is “All This Shit is Mine”. Unfortunately, that’s just too long. But it does reflect the attitude I have with this new phase: I’m a self-sustaining human and most of the time I really like my life.

Hopefully that gives you an idea. Feel free to comment with any suggestions you have. Looking forward to sharing life.

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good eats and the fight against daylight savings.

The November day when daylight savings starts is my least favorite day of the year. This is my thirteenth year in Ohio, and I still get sort of blindsided by the shorter days and early sunsets. Not that daylight savings doesn’t happen in the rest of the country, but I feel its effect more here.

This year, in an effort to both battle against and brace myself for the encroaching 5PM darkness, I cranked up the volume on The Soul Album and made a huge pot of soup. (Also because I welcome any opportunity to use my Le Creuset stock pot.)

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So I had a rather large zucchini squash and knew my mom had this recipe for an Italian soup with tortellini and zucchini. I changed her recipe a bit, so we will call this:

Fight Daylight Savings Soup

Here’s what you need:

  • 1 large zucchini squash, diced
  • 1 large yellow squash, diced
  • 3/4 ish c. onion, diced
  • 3/4 ish c. carrot, diced
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 28 oz can crushed/diced tomatoes (just don’t buy the can of whole tomatoes, unless you have an immersion blender)
  • 1 lb Italian or hot sausage (apparently Italian sausage was a hot commodity when I went to the grocery, so I settled with Bob Evan’s Zesty Hot sausage, which actually gave the soup a nice kick)
  • 3 c. tortellini
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • fresh parsley, chopped
  • grated parmesan
  • desire to show daylight savings who’s boss

IMG_6213Obviously the Reese’s cups weren’t part of the soup, but hurray for discounted Halloween candy (a major help in the fight against dark days)!

Simmer the onion, carrots, garlic, and broth for 30 minutes. I said “3/4 ish cup” for the onions and carrots because I don’t measure too strictly (or at all) unless I’m baking. My mom’s recipe uses a half cup of each, but I like a heartier soup (sidebar: is “hearty” the most-used adjective to describe soups?) so I chopped a little more. Boo is always very curious what’s happening in the kitchen.

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While that simmers, sauté the sausage until cooked through. When your thirty minutes are up, add the diced squash, sausage, can of tomatoes (and juice), basil, oregano, salt, and pepper. So when I said I don’t really measure, that also applied to the spices. I didn’t measure those, I just added as I tasted, but would estimate I put about a teaspoon of basil and oregano each.

I diced the squash up fairly small, because while I do like to have a full soup, I don’t like having huge chunks of veggies and other ingredients. I also added some water, as the soup was getting pretty thick.

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Simmer for another hour and a half, or longer. I let mine simmer for quite a few hours because I just wasn’t ready for dinner after an hour and a half. When you’re ready to eat, add the tortellini and let it cook for another 10 minutes or so. They like to stay floating up at the top.

IMG_6212And finally, garnish with fresh, chopped parsley and/or grated parmesan and an “F you daylight savings!”

IMG_6210I’ve found that the tortellini really thickens up the soup a lot after storing the leftovers. Next time, I may just add the tortellini for each meal. Enjoy!

music mondays: allyse huey, aka adubz

This week’s Music Monday is a shameless plug for my friend, songwriter and musician Allyse Huey (formerly known as ADubz).

Allyse and I were roommates for a long time until she decided she’d rather live with a boy. Lame. But I’ve been able to see her growth as a musician firsthand and am so proud of her. The rest of our roommates and I have teased Allyse for having so many hobbies over the years, but music has always been the one that sticks. She used to scoff at my musical tastes, but I think after making her a mixtape of mostly folk music a few years back, she saw the light. And now’s she’s a songwriter in her own right.

Allyse has become very involved with the Columbus Songwriters Association and has been playing open mics and other local shows for the last year or two (I need a fact checker). In college, we used to beg Allyse to play some songs for us, but she typically did not oblige us. I love to see her get up on a stage now, fearlessly performing songs that she has written. I’m so impressed by her gift to write both lyrics and music.

Take a look at her website, facebook page, and soundcloud to hear some songs. My favorites are “Stay” and “Vultures Will Circle”, but also check out “The Vineyard” and “Pool of Dreams” for Allyse’s killer whistling skills, of which I’ve always been jealous. She’s recorded everything herself so far, but will be recording with a sound engineer this week, yay!

Allyse will be playing this Wednesday night at The Tree Bar.

so I asked Stephen Thompson a question.

Stephen Thompson (of NPR Music and the AV Club) runs this column on NPR called The Good Listener. In the column, he answers questions that people send in, ranging from How do I name my band? to How do I learn to love country music?

So I recently sent in a question about set lengths for live shows. And Stephen answered! My email was a little long, so they shortened it on the blog site (and made some edits, what’s the deal guys?). Here’s what I originally asked:

I’ve got a two-parter question for Stephen Thompson’s The Good Listener column. 1. How long do you think a set should be for a headlining band on tour? 2. Should a band always play their “hits” at a live show?
I go to a decent amount of shows, and lately have been surprised by the shortness of sets. This week I saw Franz Ferdinand, and they were awesome. Their set started around 9 and was over by 10:30. I know it takes a lot of energy to rock out, but it surprised me that they were done so early. They also didn’t play “Right Action”. I wasn’t too bugged by that because I like other tracks more (which they played), but did think it was strange for a band to skip their current single.
Recently I won tickets to see Ani DiFranco. She also put on a great show, but played an even shorter set, maybe an hour and fifteen minutes. Since I got my tickets for free, I couldn’t be too upset about the length. But, I did think if I’d paid $30 plus Ticketmaster fees and was a long-standing fan, I might have been a little ticked she didn’t play longer. Especially since she has such a huge discography to work with.
There’s no hard-and-fast rule for how long a band should play, but is there a magic set length? Should you get a longer set if the show is more expensive? I’ll keep going to live shows, and will always pay to see a band I really like, but I hope shorter sets don’t become commonplace.

Stephen pretty much said, “It depends.” I knew I was asking a question that likely wouldn’t receive a definitive answer, but it’s nice to hear perspective from someone who’s been writing about music for awhile. And I was mostly just excited to get a response. Here’s the link to the post.

The thing about the two shows I listed in my email is, I actually won both those tickets. I’m really not complaining about the length of either because I’m not a crazy big-time fan of FF or Ani, but was more just surprised by what seemed to be a trend in shorter sets. I wrote about Ani’s show a few weeks ago.

So what do you guys think? Have you dropped a lot of money for a show and been disappointed with the length and/or song selection? Can a concert be too long or too short? (I say yes to both.) Do you have an ideal length?

good eats: fall means caramel and apple everything

photo 5-2A few weeks ago I went apple picking for the first time. I should say the first successful time. Quick story. I tried to go apple picking a couple years ago with some friends. We found an orchard online and drove 45 minutes out of the city and into the part of suburbia that is still a little rural. We followed the directions and turned into the drive for the orchard only to see an incredibly dilapidated sign and NO TREES. That’s right, the trees had all been bulldozed, along with my dreams of endless apple baked goods. When we asked at the nearby pumpkin patch what happened to the orchard, a man informed us, “Oh well, Old Man McDonald died last year and they just decided to tear it all down.” DREAMS CRUSHED TWICE. THAT IS SO SAD.

We ended up driving to Whole Foods and spending way too much on organic apples and cider. I felt like I was in a sitcom. The TV Guide description would have read, “City girls try to do country thing, fail miserably.”

So anyway, this time was a much bigger success! Here are a couple things I made with the bounty:

Skillet Salty Caramel Apple Crisp from Tasty Kitchen.
A few notes: I don’t have a kitchen scale, and while I have weighed peaches before by standing on my scale with and without them, I chose to just wing it with the apples. I used these three semi-giant apples:

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If you don’t have half-and-half at home (and don’t need it for your coffee), but do have milk, you can just use that. Also, I say use whatever apples you like. If I’d had Granny Smith, I would have used those because I like the tartness for baking, but Bon Appetit recommends a few others.

So, here’s the finished product:

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Next up are PW’s Caramel Apple Sticky Buns. I love the Pioneer Woman because she’s funny, sassy, and she doesn’t try to make everything into its healthy counterpart. This lady is not afraid of butter. It also helps that she’s not a racist. Notes on this one: Her recipe is a double batch. I didn’t realize that when I started and even though I had enough ingredients for two pans of sticky buns, I didn’t need two pans of sticky buns, ya know? I’d also recommend using more apples than she used in the recipe, depending on the size, obviously. But I wanted the apples to have more of a spotlight than they got.

The secret to these buns is that you pour the caramel in the pan first, then the apples, then the buns. So, when you take the pan out of the oven, it looks like just some plain ol’ cinnamon rolls.

photo 2-2But the trick is to put a serving dish on top of the pan, then flip it over to get all the glorious caramel stickiness on top:

photo 3-2Confession: I don’t think it looks super appetizing this way! I also had light corn syrup and not dark, so that makes a difference in appearance. But don’t be fooled, these are delicious.

Now for the last treat (spoiler, no apples included): Caramel Corn! I love popcorn in all forms, but caramel corn is a great fall treat. This recipe makes quite a bit of popcorn, but it keeps well. So, here it is:

  • 8ish cups freshly popped corn
  • 1 cup butter
  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • ½ cup light corn syrup
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

So, I say 8ish cups of popcorn because I rarely measure things. I pop the corn in my 8 quart stock pot and put in enough kernels to almost cover the bottom of the pot. Once popped, I’d guess it’s close to 8 cups. The good thing about making caramel corn is you can’t really mess it up, if you made too much caramel, just don’t use it all; if you need more, it’s easy enough to make quickly.

Alright, pop your corn and preheat the oven to 225ºF. In a pot, melt the butter and brown sugar over medium heat. Once melted, stir in the corn syrup and salt. Raise the heat and boil for 5 minutes, without stirring.

photo 1-2Remove from heat and add the vanilla and baking soda. Resist the urge to pour boiling sugary goodness straight in your mouth. Instead, pour the caramel over the popped corn and stir to coat evenly. Bake the corn in an oven-safe bowl (or two casserole dishes in my case) for 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. Let the corn cool before eating. I prefer to pour it out onto parchment paper to cool so that I can break up the chunks. If you don’t mind the big chunks of caramel corn, let it cool in the bowl or baking dish.

Happy fall!